What problems can a non-certified translator create?

A good standard is the one created by the International Standards Organization, ISO 17100.

What if I use a non-certified translator?

Just as I answered in a prior post, you need to get a certified translator, PREFERABLY.

My answer relates to legal proceedings in the United States only. Unfortunately, many judges do not understand the difference between a translator and an interpreter and tend to use them indistinctly. But to their credit, there is a certain knowledge of legal terminology that I have noticed in court interpreters, that is hard to find in even certified translators. This is because legal jargon is a language in and of itself.

So, when translating documents to be used in court, not only is it recommended that you get a certified translator (if there is a certification for the particular language) but also that you get someone specialized in the legal field.

What if I use a non-certified translator for languages with no certification?

A good standard is the one created by the International Standards Organization, ISO 17100.

ISO 17100

It describes a two-person process of translating and then editing. Both individuals must fulfill certain educational and experience requirements. This system can be used also for languages where there is no existent certification. A good translation company will have a system in place to ensure quality and to make it more likely that your document will be accepted by the courts.


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